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Flu Vaccination Linked to 40% Reduced Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease – Neuroscience News

Summary: Older adults who received at least one flu vaccination were 40% less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease over the course of a four-year follow-up than their peers who did not receive a vaccine. Source: UT Houston People who received at least one influenza vaccine were 40% less likely than their non-vaccinated peers to develop …

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WHO panel: Monkeypox not a global emergency ‘at this stage’

LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization said the escalating monkeypox outbreak in more than 50 countries should be closely monitored but does not warrant being declared a global health emergency. In a statement Saturday, a WHO emergency committee said many aspects of the outbreak were “unusual” and acknowledged that monkeypox — which is endemic …

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Long covid symptoms are often overlooked in seniors

Placeholder while article actions load Nearly 18 months after getting the coronavirus and spending weeks in the hospital, Terry Bell struggles with hanging up his shirts and pants after doing the laundry. Lifting his clothes, raising his arms, arranging items in his closet leave Bell short of breath and often trigger severe fatigue. He walks …

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Can our mitochondria help to beat long Covid?

At Cambridge University’s MRC Mitochondrial Biology Unit, Michal Minczuk is one of a growing number of scientists around the world aiming to find new ways of improving mitochondrial health. This line of research could help provide much-needed treatments for people with long Covid, as well as revolutionising our understanding of everything from neurodegenerative illnesses such …

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Vaccinations for health care workers, those at risk offered

An outbreak of monkeypox has grown over the last two months with more than 4,100 confirmed cases worldwide. Monkeypox cases in the U.S. have surpassed 200 cases in 25 states including California, Florida, New York and Texas. Health officials have begun vaccinations for those at risk. New York City opened a vaccine clinic last week. Cases …

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How Emotionally Intelligent People Use the Rule of Rewiring to Hack Their Brains and Change Their Habits

Emily’s a passionate entrepreneur who’s doing a lot of things right…But she’s also a workaholic. Emily has every intention of closing shop on Friday and spending the weekend with her family. But a potential client asked for a meeting this Saturday, and she couldn’t say no. Sunday won’t be a day off either, since she’s …

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Research Suggests There’s a Big Overlooked Benefit of Having Dyslexia

The modern world is stitched together by threads of written language. For those with the reading disorder dyslexia, the endless tangle of words can feel like an obstacle to survival.   Long framed purely as a learning disorder, the neurological condition that makes the decoding of text so difficult could also benefit individuals and their …

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Monkeypox cases surge as WHO stops short of declaring a global emergency

Placeholder while article actions load The World Health Organization has decided not to declare monkeypox a global emergency despite a rapid rise in cases in Europe, electing instead to describe it as an “evolving health threat.” The announcement Saturday comes after the WHO’s International Health Regulations Emergency Committee met last week to discuss whether the …

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Covid variants inevitable as long as virus continues to spread, doctors say

The virus that causes covid-19 has mutated again and again, and experts say new variants will continue, in part because of the nature of the virus and also because large swaths of the population choose not to be vaccinated. “Should we expect more variants? The answer is yes,” said Dr. Mohamed Yassin, director of infection …

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